Monday, 15 February 2016

Bird List, Tobago

Order follows Birds of Trinidad and Tobago (Helm Field Guides). Photos and sound recordings will be updated as they are processed.

Rufous-vented Chachalaca (Ortalis ruficauda) Audio Recording Photo

Red-billed Tropicbird (Phaethon aetherus)

Brown Pelican (Pelicanus occidentalis)

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens)

Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis)

Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platyperus)

Pale-vented pigeon (Patagioenas cayennensis)
Eared Dove (Zenaida auricuata)
White-tipped Dove (Leptotila verreauxi)

Orange-winged Parrot (Amazona amazonica)

Short-tailed Swift (Chaetura brachyura)

White-tailed Sabrewing (Campylopterus ensipennis)
Black-throated Mango (Anthracothorax nigricolis)
Copper-rumped Hummingbird (Amazilia tobaci)

Collared Trogon (Trogon collaris)

Trinidad Motmot (Momotus bahamensis)

Rufous-tailed Jacamar (Galbula ruficauda)

Red-crowned Woodpecker (Melanerpes rubricapillus)

Barred Antshrike (Thamnophilus doliatus)

Ochre-bellied Flycatcher (Mionectes oleagineus)
Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus)

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)

Spectacled Thrush (Turdus nudigenis)

Tropical Mockingbird (Mimus gilvus)

White-lined Tanager (Tachyphonus lucuosus)
Blue-grey Tanager (Thraupis episcopus)
Palm Tanager (Thraupis plamarum)

Incertae Sedis
Bananaquit (Coereba flaveola) Nesting Video

Blue-black Grassquit (Volatinia jacarina)

Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus)

Monday, 8 February 2016

The First European Congress on Orthoptera Conservation

The First European Congress on Orthoptera Conservation will be held from 18 to 20 March 2016 at Trier University.

The First European Congress on Orthoptera Conservation (ECOC) will be the first Pan-European meeting of Orthopterists, providing the opportunity to meet Orthopterologists from Europe and elsewhere. 

Trier is the oldest city in Germany and maintains some UNESCO World Heritage sites, such as the Roman buildings Porta Nigra, Imperial Baths, Basilika, Amphitheater, as well as the medieval cathedral. However, it also has a "Grasshopper Fountain".

Bananaquit nesting

In an attempt to use the GoPro for something other than underwater photography, here is a video of the late stages of nest construction by a Bananaquit (Coereba flaveola luteola) from Tobago.

Monday, 21 December 2015

NHM Sound Archive (Part 1): Mole Crickets

Today a paper written by myself and Natural History Museum (NHM) volunteer Yoke-Shum Broom was published in the Biodiversity Data Journal. It is the first data paper to come from the NHM Sound Archive digitisation project. The archive itself is part of the inspiration behind the BioAcoustica project (Baker et al, 2015). The paper covers the Mole Crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae).

The paper is certainly modest compared to other forthcoming data papers on the NHM's collection of Orthoptera sounds (and even our previous paper on African cicada songs), however it is of interest due to the fact we have plaster casts of two of the species singing burrows to supplement the sound recordings.

Gryllotalpa vineae was first described by Bennet-Clark in 1970 who later, published on the acoustic properties of its singing burrow (see figure).

The existence of the singing burrow cast and the recordings has previously been limited to those with knowledge of the NHM's Orthoptera collection and those who have read Bennet-Clark's papers. To aid access (and hopefully increase interest) in these items the burrow casts we have (of Gryllotalpa vineae and also Gryllotalpa gryllotalpa) have been laser scanned. 3D models of the burrows have been made available on the NHM's Data Portal.

The paper has more details: Natural History Museum Sound Archive I: Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae Leach, 1815, including 3D scans of burrow casts of Gryllotalpa gryllotalpa Linnaeus, 1758 and Gryllotalpa vineae Bennet-Clark, 1970.

Sunday, 13 December 2015

Ecoacoustics Congress 2016

Tuesday, 8 December 2015

Bioacoustics workshop at Stellenbosch University (February 2016)

Saturday, 5 December 2015

Marianna Simnett - Blue Roses

Earlier this year I was tasked with creating a (fake) control backpack to temporarily attach to a Blaberus cockroach as part of Marianna Simnett's film Blue Roses. You can watch the film below. The cockroach, now without backpack, is enjoying its retirement.